How can we improve the new FCC.gov?

Consider the [Crowd] Source

I see where this beta site is trying to go, but I think it goes too far. I applaud the attempt, but graphics should be used judiciously to prevent "information overload" by breaking up text with aesthetically pleasing art. In this case, the graphics dominate the front page, leaving very little visual space to convey meaningful content. Because this is a government website upon which people rely to obtain information, we can strike a better balance. The graphics can be smaller and achieve the same effects. The "feature" videos can be placed in a "meet the FCC" space, as Function Over Form has suggested elsewhere. In addition, so much negative space is unnecessary. These changes would leave more space on the front page for the most important textual content. I applaud the attempt to create a more robust back-end search engine, but the search bar should not be relied upon so heavily. There should be more hypertext options on the front page for key content. For example, without using the search bar it took me four clicks from the drop down menu to get to the "file a complaint" page, which offered only a video tutorial on how to file a complaint (and no link to complaint forms). That is too deep for someone using "old school" navigation methods, as many consumers are apt to do. This is not a post by some curmudgeon resistance to change. At the risk of sounding immodest, I am a Gen X attorney who can hand code PHP. I applaud the effort, but I think we can find a better balance.

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    William Beckwith shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

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      • Chip Cooper commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I would agree with; but disagree with the defining terms used to define the purpose of graphics: Example: I agree that "graphics should be used judiciously to prevent "information overload" however I disagree that it's sole function should be to delineate text into a pleasing distribution. Graphics also serve the purpose of consolidating a large amount of data into a more understandable form. Perhaps this goes without saying. A Ted Talks episode covers how to accomplish this in a creative and instructive manner.

        This is where the suggested Information Architect can help delineate different areas which lead intuitively into the information or end result needed. The doorway to this feedback section: "Take Action" was intuitive and helpful.

      • AdminFCC (new media, Federal Communications Commission) commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Thanks for the feedback, William. We've shortened the carousel images on the homepage and elsewhere on the site in order to improve this dynamic. We've also made the homepage links more robust, numerous, and useful. Thanks for the feedback and please keep giving us more ideas. We'll continue to work to incorporate it into the website. -FCC New Media

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